When veteran NASA photographer Bill Ingalls set up his gear for Tuesday's SpaceX Falcon 9 launch he never could've imagined that it'd be a photo of one of his cameras that would get so much attention.

After the rocket successfully took off, images of his freshly charred camera spread like fire online. Most people assumed it must've been set up too close to the launch site, but that's not what happened.

Ingalls told NASA.com that the "melted camera" met its demise thanks to a brush fire sparked by the rocket launch.

"Unfortunately, the launch started a grass fire that toasted one of the cameras outside the perimeter," Ingalls explained.

NASA Photographer Bill Ingalls's camera after it was caught in brushfire caused by the launch of the NASA/German GRACE-FO from Vandenberg Air Force Base on May 22, 2018.
NASA Photographer Bill Ingalls's camera after it was caught in brushfire caused by the launch of the NASA/German GRACE-FO from Vandenberg Air Force Base on May 22, 2018.  
NASA/Bill Ingalls

Ironically the damaged camera was the one he set up furthest from the launch pad, about a quarter of a mile away. The four cameras placed inside the launch pad safety perimeter were undamaged.

Firefighters were waiting to greet him when Ingalls returned to the site. He quickly realized the camera was destroyed and forced open the camera to see if the memory card could be salvaged, according to NASA.com.

Remarkably, the pictures survived and captured some shots of the launch as well as the fire responsible for destroying the camera.

Images of a brushfire approaching, then destroying, a remote camera set up to photograph the NASA/German GRACE-FO launch on May 22, 2018.
Images of a brushfire approaching, then destroying, a remote camera set up to photograph the NASA/German GRACE-FO launch on May 22, 2018.  
NASA/Bill Ingalls

Ingalls has dubbed the melted mess his "toasty" camera, and it'll likely be put on display at NASA's headquarters in Washington, DC.

Images of a brushfire approaching, then destroying, a remote camera set up to photograph the NASA/German GRACE-FO launch on May 22, 2018.
Images of a brushfire approaching, then destroying, a remote camera set up to photograph the NASA/German GRACE-FO launch on May 22, 2018.  
NASA/Bill Ingalls