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Wet, cold spring causing concern for farmers

Usually by mid-May, Jay Gordon said he has about half of his corn planted.

GRAYS HARBOR COUNTY, Wash. — Jay Gordon’s family has been farming in Grays Harbor County since 1872. Gordon said the 2022 harvest could be the worst.

“We’re probably going to have this cold and wet at least through July,” said Gordon.

Usually, by mid-May, Gordon said he has about half of his corn planted.

He hasn’t put any seeds in the ground this year.

“The corn seeds are sitting in the barn. The grass seeds are sitting in the barn. The barley seeds are sitting in the barn. The wheat seeds are sitting in the barn,” Gordon said, adding farmers risk having seeds rot in the ground if they’re planted when it’s as wet and cold as it has been this April and May.

Gordon said he’s watching the weather forecasts closely for any breaks in the rain, especially if there's a warming trend.

“We will run our tractors 24 hours a day, we’ll have no choice,” said Gordon.

Gordon said some farmers may choose to skip planting crops this year, if the weather doesn’t improve.

But if he can't plant his traditional produce and grains, he said he will likely rely on more hardy crops, like cabbage, to help make some money off his family’s land.

“You got bills to pay, taxes come due, employees need salaries,” said Gordon. “You gotta make money somehow with what Mother Nature deals you.”