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Lynnwood elementary teacher will study polar bears in the Arctic

A Lynnwood teacher is about to take the trip of a lifetime to study polar bears.

LYNNWOOD, Wash. — A Lynnwood teacher is about to take the trip of a lifetime to study polar bears and her students couldn't be more excited. Jennie Warmouth, is joining a group of scientists and National Geographic photographers to study the arctic ecosystem and of course polar bears. 

It's part of the National Geographic Society and Lindblad Expeditions 13th Annual Grosvenor Teacher Fellowship Class.

Warmouth's students, from Spruce Elementary, visited PAWS animal rescue Friday, donating thousands of pounds of dog food and kitty litter as well as a check for $286.

They learned about how PAWS also rescues wildlife like bears because their teacher is about to take a trip of a lifetime to see bears that few of us will ever encounter. One of those students came dressed for the occasion.

“I am wearing a polar bear hat,” said 7-year-old Kiana Davis. "This book about polar bears because my teacher is going to the Arctic.”

The Arctic is a ways away from Lynnwood, but Kiana gets the idea. 

“It’s at the top of the world,” she said.

“I hope that they feel connected and through my having this opportunity that they begin to care more deeply about another region of the world and begin to make connections between their local decisions and global impact,” Warmouth said.

She will send back videos to teach the kids about her experience and the kids will send questions to direct the research.

“I am proud that my kids have an avenue to make a real difference in the life of animals,” Warmouth said.

Kiana’s peers got to see the wildlife rehab center at PAWS where black bears are cared for, which is a local connection to their teacher’s upcoming adventure.

“It’s going to be super fun for her and I think it is going to be so cool for her to experience, to see in person, a real polar bear,” Kiana said.