WASHINGTON — Monday is Veterans Day and there are several places across western Washington veterans and their families can gather to honor and celebrate those who have served. 

BELLINGHAM:

Albert J. Hamilton American Legion Post No. 7 and the city of Bellingham are sponsoring a Veterans Day ceremony.

The event begins at 11 a.m. Monday at Bellingham City Hall at 210 Lottie Street. Doors open at 10 a.m.

EVERETT:

The Carl Gipson Senior Center is hosting its 14th annual Veterans Day USO Dance. Veterans of all wars, ages 50 and older, and their partners are invited to attend. Veterans will enjoy dancing to a 16-piece swing band, special ceremonies, food, and refreshments. The Center is located at 3025 Lombard Avenue. Admission is free, but reservations are required. You can call 425-257-8780 to reserve your spot!

LYNNWOOD:

The Northwest Veteran’s Museum will be open Monday to celebrate Veterans Day. The museum is in the Lynnwood Heritage Park at 19921 Poplar Way. Veterans and their families are encouraged to visit during the hours of 11–3 p.m.

SEATTLE:

Pike Place Market is honoring veterans on Monday with a flag-raising ceremony at 10 a.m. It will take place at the Pike Place Market Clock & Sign. Six American flags will be added below the famous Clock & Sign and will stay up through the following Sunday.

There will also be lots of deals and discounts at businesses throughout the Market for veterans and active-duty military members. 

SEATAC:

The city of SeaTac will be dedicating its very first public Veterans Memorial on Monday. The memorial will be located adjacent to the SeaTac Community Center at 13735 24th Avenue South. The SeaTac Veterans Memorial will pay tribute to men and women military veterans of the past and present for their service. It will include engraved paver tiles as a lasting way to remember those who have served. The dedication will take place from 11 to 11:30 a.m.

TACOMA:

The Tacoma Historical Society and American Legion Post #2 are hosting a service at War Memorial Park on Sixth and MacArthur. The service will happen at 11 a.m. On-site transportation up and down the hill will be provided.

OLYMPIA:

Hundreds are expected to attend a Veterans Day celebration on the Capitol Campus in Olympia Monday. The event is scheduled from 11 a.m. to noon in the Legislative Building. After the ceremony, the Daughters of the American Revolution Sacajawea Chapter will read the Vietnam Memorial inscription following by the list of names of Washington state residents who were killed or missing in action.

The event is open to the public and will feature music by the American Legion Band, speakers, a cannon salute and a 21-gun salute near the north stairs of the Capitol Building.

PORT ANGELES:

The Coast Guard Air Station in Port Angeles will host its annual Veterans Day ceremony sponsored by the Clallam County Veterans Association at 10:30 a.m. Monday.

The public is welcome to attend and can enter the facility from the Front Gate at 1 Ediz Hook Road starting at 9:30 a.m. The Coast Guard says to plan to arrive early and expect delays at the gate due to enhanced security. All guests must arrive by vehicle, there are no walk-ons or bicycles permitted. Attendees must also present a valid government-issued form of identification. Bags will not be permitted inside and must remain in your vehicle.

Everyone is invited to remain after the ceremony for complimentary refreshments. The guest speaker is Rear Adm. Scott Gray, commander, Navy Region Northwest.

WASHINGTON STATE PARKS: 

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission has designated Veterans Day, Nov. 11 as one of their last two free days of 2019. 

That means on Monday, veterans and any other visitors will not need a Discover Pass to get into any Washington State Parks. 

The final free day of this year is the day after Thanksgiving, Nov. 29. 

Editor's note: The above video profiling a Chehalis veterans museum previously aired on KING 5 in 2018. 

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