x
Breaking News
More () »

Washington rated 8th worst state for auto theft, report finds

Car theft increased by nearly 10% in Washington from 2019 to 2020, a report found.

Has your vehicle been stolen lately? You’re not alone.

According to the latest National Insurance Crime Bureau’s (NICB) Hot Spots Report, auto theft increased by nearly 10% in 2020 compared to 2019. 

Thefts increased from 34,172 vehicles in 2019 to 37,465 in 2020, the report found.

NICB said, "The auto theft rate, which measures the number of vehicles stolen per 100,000 residents, also increased in Washington in 2020, from 331.06 to 368.46 – the nation’s 8th highest theft rate."

Editor's note: Stats in this story were corrected on Sept. 23, 2021.

>> Download KING 5's Roku and Amazon Fire apps to watch live newscasts and video on demand

The annual report showed an increase in auto thefts across the entire country.

NICB said that vehicle theft is fairly widespread, and the crime increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the U.S., a car is stolen every 36 seconds. That makes it the most common property crime, according to the FBI, costing citizens about $6 billion in 2019.

The Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPC) says that property crime is the most common type of crime reported in the state, representing 73.7% of all reported offenses.  

Some easy ways to prevent someone from stealing your vehicle in addition to locking your car include parking in a well-lit area, getting an audible alarm, using a smart key and getting a GPS tracker in your car.

Vehicle theft wasn’t the only crime Washington saw go up in 2020.

Murder increased 50% and property crimes increased by 13.8%, according to a crime report by the WASPC.

Washington, D.C. took the top spot for worst vehicle theft rate with near 563 thefts per 100,000 residents, an increase of 40% from 2019 to 2020.

The nation’s capital was followed by Colorado, California, Missouri and New Mexico.

For a daily roundup of everything you need to know for across western Washingtonsign up for our 5 Things to Know email newsletter.