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Seattle teacher creates flower art to raise money for South Park community

Amelia Stern's flower creations have raised money to support Black communities and her South Park neighbors in need of food.

While thousands of people across the country continue to march against racial injustice, smaller efforts are taking root as well. 

A local teacher is using her time away from the classroom to spread a message of hope in Seattle's South Park neighborhood. 

”Take three soda cans, cut the bottom off of one and that becomes the center and the other 2 become the petals," said Amelia Stern.

As a health teacher, Stern is usually educating her students about the importance of taking care of themselves and the world. 

"If I’m not out marching everyday, I can be doing that instead,” said Stern. 

Over the last three weeks, she's made flowers out of soda cans to decorate her home and her South Park neighborhood. 

“It brightens peoples lives, but also gives them a sense of purpose, as well, to be giving back,” said Stern. 

The fundraising aspect started by accident when neighbors started donating $10 dollars per flower.

In a matter of weeks, Stern raised nearly $1,000 -- money she donated to non-profits, including the Equal Justice Initiative, Black Lives Matter Global Network,  Africatown Community Land Trust (COVID-19 Fund) and South Park Food Tables. 

"That part felt pretty easy to me. I’m a teacher and I’ve definitely been working toward racial justice within education for some time and that is a slow-plotting battle, but definitely worthwhile. I know there are a lot of organizations that could really use the help right now,” said Stern.

She is now focusing on helping the South Park area. Any new donations for her flowers will go to food resources for families in need.

If you're interested in purchasing a flower, email FlowersForFood27@gmail.com

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