Seattle is a pretty inclusive city, but it can always be better. At least that's what Andrea Kovich thinks.

"My career depends on people believing that the authentic voices need to be heard. That people with disabilities can do theater," said Kovich.

Kovich has curated a series of six play readings by deaf or disabled playwrights from Canada, the United Kingdom and here in the states. Writer/director Howie Seago grew up in Tacoma and now lives in Seattle.

"I think the subject is very important because it's happened over and over again, the molestation of deaf children," said Seago.

He's talking about "Holy Water," a play based on actual events, focused on boys in a Milwaukee school for the deaf who were molested by the Priest there.

"The biggest challenge is getting this ready for a public reading. We can't do it like hearing people do. We have to do it in our own special, visual, physical approach," said Seago.

The series is an opportunity for the deaf and disabled theater community to highlight their abilities, share them with the general public, and hopefully secure more opportunities in mainstream theater across the city. That's what Director Maggie Roberts hopes for.

"How you become an ally is through action. And I think this is a great opportunity to start to move in that direction with more inclusion in the arts," she said.

The production runs through July 22 with all performances at the Center Theatre Black Box inside the Armory at Seattle Center. Most shows will run twice and are free.