SEATTLE — Seattle city leaders say they have no plans to remove a homeless encampment along Utah Ave. S., which is the stretch of road that turns into the "Hawk Alley" tailgate party during some Seahawks games.

There were several tents and RVs lining the public parking spaces along Utah Ave. S. Friday. 

"You see in the movies of Seattle they're always talking about the rain, but really they should be talking about the homeless problem," said Tyler Hewett, who helps set-up the Hawk Alley Tailgate.  

The Seahawks will play the Bengals on Sunday in their season opener at CenturyLink Field. 

Also see | New authority to fight homelessness will boost accountability, Seattle mayor says

City homeless outreach teams visited the encampment Friday, a city spokesperson said, but no notice was issued telling the campers they needed to pack up.

Hewitt said the party that usually draws die-hard fans the night before a game is cut short because tailgate spots have been replaced with homeless camps. 

"Everyone has their spot before we show-up and seeing this [Saturday], where is everybody?" said Hewett. 

Some fans worry the street has sanitary and safety hazards. 

"[There's] a whole block and a half of garbage. It's disgusting," said Bobby Swan who plans to tailgate and parked his camper Saturday.

Hawk Ally Tailgate expects at least 300 people before Sunday's game. The tailgate asks for a $20 donation, which includes drink tickets and unlimited food. 100 percent of the tailgate's proceeds go to charity. One of the charities is Vision House, a group providing housing to homeless families. 

Also see | Seahawks opening sensory room at CenturyLink Field

"I want to see positive change. I want to see the community coming together and lifting the people who have fallen," said Hewett. 

Fans acknowledged the Seattle's homeless problem is complicated, but they worry about the image Hawk Ally will give to those visiting from out of town.