A new batch of election results Wednesday didn’t change the Seattle City Council returns that much, and in District 3, the incumbent could be in trouble.

“She’s incredibly vulnerable,” said Egan Orion, who is trailing Kshama Sawant in the primary 34-23, but has the biggest share of second place. 

“We always expected Sawant in the primary to be first, and us to be second,” he said Wednesday, expressing confidence that Sawant’s number is a sign of weakness. “That's a great position to be in, against an incumbent, for a first time politician, heck yeah. I feel really good about it, and Sawant’s number is incredibly low for an incumbent, so it just proves what we though all along.”

Sawant had 52% of the primary vote 4 years ago, and 55% in the general, so there is some reason for opponents to see an opportunity.

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Tens of thousands of dollars have poured in from outside the city, and large corporations, into PACs, likely angered by the 2018 fight over a Head Tax. Many political observers found the council’s flip flop on the issue a sign of weakness, and made voters angry for change.

The two other incumbents, Lisa Herbold and Debora Juarez, continue to hang below 50% in the primary. 

Juarez, reached by phone on Wednesday, said she was happy with the result and didn’t read too much into the number. 

“I didn’t think this was going to be a cakewalk,” she told KING5, “I feel like the campaign shows that I’ve honored the needs of the district.” 

She highlighted her worked with Sound Transit, and to help broker a deal for the renovation of Northgate Mall, and the new NHL training facility and headquarters. 

“I know what I’m hearing on the ground, and feel good,” she said.

There is no incumbent in District 7, which includes Downtown, Queen Anne and Magnolia, and where crime and homelessness have been important issues. Hence, perhaps, why two “law and order” candidates have moved on. Deputy City Attorney Andrew Lewis will face off against former Seattle Police Chief Jim Pugel. The latter has business support, while Lewis laid claim to labor endorsements. Still, the two are already trying to use their resumes to separate themselves.

“I've gone back to dealing with a big budget, when I was assistant chief, and chief of police with the police department,” said Pugel Wednesday, while noting that people in the district also want to discuss the future of the Magnolia Bridge.

Lewis countered saying, “I'm the only person in the race who have argued in the municipal court for the people of Seattle and brought successful prosecutions, you know I've also worked on diversion programs that have been impactful in getting people services.”

Another batch of numbers are expected from King County Elections Thursday afternoon.

For full election results, click here.