SPOKANE, Wash. — Correction: A previous version of this article said that according to Spokane health officials, public school staff will be required to show proof of vaccination starting this summer. State health officials clarified the change only applies to day care workers. 

Issaquah High School was closed Thursday after the district confirmed a staff member came to work while infected with the measles.       

It's one of five new cases in Washington.

Issaquah School District leaders said they have immunization proof from all students but need to verify the vaccination status of staff members.

During the hiring process staff members in the Issaquah School district provide documentation confirming when they were immunized for diseases like measles, but this isn't the case for all school districts.

Washington state does not require staff to be current on their vaccinations.

In the Spokane School District, faculty went through a verification process in February. They offered immunizations for anyone unvaccinated.
           
A spokesperson said should there be an outbreak, staff who can't provide immunization records cannot return to work until the quarantine ends. Statewide it's been up to each school district to decide what's required.

Earlier in May, Governor Jay Inslee signed a law removing the personal and philosophical option to exempt children from the MMR vaccine required for school and child care entry.

The new law also makes it mandatory for day care staff and volunteers to provide immunization records showing they have received the MMR vaccine or proof of immunity. 

Public school teachers are still not required statewide to have proof of immunity. 

The new law goes into effect on July 28.

RELATED: Issaquah High School will reopen Friday after measles check

RELATED: Man with measles potentially exposes public in King, Pierce counties

RELATED: Gov. Inslee signs bill limiting measles vaccine exemptions