An infant and a teenager in King County have been diagnosed with measles, according to Seattle & King County Public Health. There has now been a total of nine measles cases in King County since the beginning of May.

The teenager visited the Auburn Community Center on July 6 before being diagnosed. Health officials said the teen had "household contact" with someone previously diagnosed with measles.

The infant who was diagnosed is not known to have visited any public locations while infectious. The baby also had "household contact" with someone who had previously been diagnosed with measles, officials said.

Also see | Do teachers in Washington need to be vaccinated for measles?

“Measles cases continue to occur in King County, which means we face an ongoing risk of outbreaks among people who don't have immunity," said Jeff Duchin, Health Officer for Public Health – Seattle & King County. "Measles vaccine is safe, effective, and offers excellent protection. If you aren't sure if you're up to date with the recommended doses of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR), see your health care provider and get a dose of MMR if needed."

A child in King County was diagnosed with measles at the end of June. The child visited a Fred Meyer in Kent and Seattle Children’s Emergency Department before being diagnosed. Seattle Children's notified patients who may have been exposed.

The potential exposure sites are listed below:

6/19/2019 | 6:45 p.m. – 9:45 p.m. - Fred Meyer, 25250 Pacific Hwy S., Kent 

6/23/2019 | 12:45 a.m. - 2:45 a.m. - Emergency Department, Seattle Children’s Hospital 4800 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle

6/26/2019 | 2:30 a.m. – 4:30 a.m. - Emergency Department, Seattle Children’s Hospital 4800 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle

6/26/2019 | 1:10 p.m. - 3:10 p.m. - Emergency Department, Seattle Children’s Hospital 4800 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle

7/6/2019 | 2 p.m. - 11 p.m. - Auburn Community Center, 910 9th St. SE, Auburn, WA 98002

Measles is highly contagious and causes fever, rash, cough, and watery eyes. Symptoms can begin seven to 21 days after exposure, and is contagious from about four days before the rash appears to four days after it ends. The virus can remain in the air for up to two hours. 

If you think you have contracted measles, notify a clinic or hospital before arriving for evaluation.

There have been 84 measles cases in Washington state so far this year, according to the Washington State Department of Health.

Also see | Travel tips to avoid illness while measles continues to spread