90 geese at Lake Sammamish State Park captured and killed

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by ZAHID ARAB / KING 5 News

KING5.com

Posted on August 3, 2013 at 5:20 PM

Updated Saturday, Aug 3 at 9:23 PM

Concerns of goose poop and harm to the environment at Lake Sammamish State Park prompted wildlife officials to capture and kill 90 geese.

“You’ve got to watch where you’re walking,” said Anthony Lammers, a park visitor.

Feces from the bird carry harmful bacteria like E.Coli and Salmonella.

Animal advocates are disgusted and are calling on state park leaders to come up with humane alternatives.

“They’re just trying to protect their babies and exist just like we are,” said Diane Weinstein, who lives near the park.

According to state officials, there were about 300 geese in the park this spring, creating a problem for the environment and the people.

“Getting bit in the butt is one thing but catch it in the front, you’re toast,” said Dutch Jackson, a park visitor.

Few birds can be spotted now, feathers and feces on the ground is mostly what park visitors see after the roundup. Weinstein is horrified about how the USDA Wildlife Service did it.

“They grab them and shove them into gas chambers in the back of their trucks. Then they gas them to death and dump them in the landfill afterwards,” she said.

The process is approved by the American Veterinary Association.

“Why would you kill them when there are humane alternatives,” said Weinstein.

State officials tried putting up screens along the edges of the water and using cardboard cutouts to scare the geese away, but both didn’t work.

“They clean the restrooms, they should cut the grass, clean up the goose poop,” said Weinstein.

Weinstein claims the killings are a way to make money and commercialize the park.

“When you talk about killing geese it doesn’t really sound like a good thing,” said James Gleeson, who was at the park with his two young children.

While Gleeson is cautious around the feces, he’s not concerned about it.

“It’s just something we assume is going to be there,” he said.

The non-profit “Action for Animals” started an online petition that calls on the state to come up with a plan to take care of the problem with humane alternatives.
 

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