Hope Solo's U.S. soccer and legal future in limbo

Hope Solo's U.S. soccer and legal future in limbo

Credit: KING

Hope Solo's U.S. soccer and legal future in limbo

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by CHRIS DANIELS / KING 5 News

Bio | Email | Follow: @ChrisDaniels5

KING5.com

Posted on June 25, 2014 at 7:19 PM

SEATTLE - Hope Solo has been the starting goalkeeper for the U.S. Women's National Team and viewed as a key piece of the squad as it prepares for the 2015 World Cup in Canada.   
 
Her recent arrest may change all that.
 
On Wednesday, U.S. Soccer Federation President Sunil Gulati said, "We'll be talking with Hope in the next 24 hours and her representatives, and I think it would be inappropriate for me to say anything else until some of these processes play out."
 
Canadian authorities also said she may not be allowed to enter Canada to compete, if convicted of domestic violence.
 
"That's correct. A criminal conviction can make a person inadmissible to Canada," emailed Kathy Liu, of the Canada Border Services Agency, which handles entrance into the country.
 
"Admissibility to Canada is considered on a case-by-case basis and is based on information that is available to our officers at the time of entry," wrote Liu, "The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) clearly defines reasons for inadmissibility. Several factors are used in determining inadmissibility, including involvement in criminal activity, health reasons, misrepresentation, or non-compliance with the Act."
 
Section 36 of IRPA says, "A foreign national is inadmissible on grounds of criminality for" (c) "committing an act outside Canada that is an offence in the place where it was committed and that, if committed in Canada, would constitute an indictable offence..."
 
The Canadian Criminal Code, section 266, defines assault as "an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.”  Assault with Bodily Harm, in section 269, is also "an indictable offence," which carries a prison term, in Canada, of up to 10 years.
 
Solo was jailed over the weekend and charged with two counts of fourth degree assault after her half-sister and nephew accused the goalkeeper of a late night assault at a Kirkland home.  One of the officers on scene noted in a report that Solo's eyes were "red and bloodshot" and her "speech was slurred and I could smell the odor of intoxicating liquor on her breath."

Kirkland Police released photos, which they say show visible bruising, swelling and cuts to both victims.
 
Solo denied the claims to officers at the scene, according to court documents. She entered a not guilty plea on Monday.
 
Canada has rejected multiple Americans from entry into the country in the past several years for DUI convictions.
 
However, there would seem to be some case law to allow athletes to compete in Canada.  The National Hockey League, National Basketball Association, Major League Soccer, National Football League, and Major League Baseball have collectively held thousands of games in the country. Brooklyn Nets coach Jason Kidd pleaded guilty to driving while impaired back in 2013, and was suspended by the NBA for two games. However, he coached multiple games in Toronto, this past season, including a playoff series.  Kidd also pleaded guilty to spousal abuse back in 2001.
 
Liu says any person can apply for "to overcome inadmissibility" which could involve seeking "rehabilitation approval" or a "Temporary Resident Permit.”
 
The Associated Press contributed to this report.
 

 

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