Regardless of vote outcome, 777X moving full speed ahead

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by GLENN FARLEY / KING5 News Aviation Specialist

Bio | Email | Follow: @GlennFarley

KING5.com

Posted on November 13, 2013 at 7:54 PM

Boeing has large facilities in lots of states, including one in San Antonio, Texas.  Texas is a right to work state, meaning union membership is optional - something unions hate.

And for years, Boeing's done mostly military, but also some commercial work, on 787s and 747-8s on the site of the former Kelly Air Force Base.

And on Tuesday night, Texas governor Rick Perry made it clear on Twitter that he would love for the 777X to "come on down." 

When it comes to issues of economic competition, states are always studying each other, and in 2011 when the 737-MAX was up for grabs, Texas and San Antonio in particular were studied in depth under then-Washington Governor Christine Gregoire.

“I can't take anything for granted,” Gregoire said.

“You've also got the San Antonio, the Alamo aerospace academy which is located there. They've stood up as a pipeline of folks,” said study author Craig Gotlieb.

Our sister station KENS visited the Alamo Academy, which grew up as a training center to try and back fill the economy as the Air Force Pulled out.

But Boeing has looked at some places most people have never heard of.

What was the runner up for the 787 a decade ago?  Tiny Kinston, North Carolina, whichh doesn't seem to be near much of anything but is a growing industrial center.

So it was no wonder that current Washington Governor Jay Inslee told KING 5 this week: “Before this started, the Boeing company had been contacted by 10 to 12 governors months ago.”

So did Kinston, North Carolina end up with nothing? Hardly. That same location Boeing was looking at is now building big parts of the Airbus 350.

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