Mountlake Terrace police officer charged with DUI

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by HEATHER GRAF / KING 5 News

Bio | Email | Follow: @HeatherGrafK5

KING5.com

Posted on April 9, 2014 at 4:45 PM

Updated Wednesday, Apr 9 at 11:36 PM

SEATTLE -- A commander who oversees the patrol division of the Mountlake Terrace Police Department is now on administrative leave, after being arrested and charged with driving under the influence.

Donald Duncan is an 18-year veteran of the police force.

According to court documents, a Washington State Patrol officer working in Snohomish County witnessed Duncan cross the centerline of traffic by approximately three tire widths.  Court documents also say he was driving at night without his headlights on and ran a red light as he was being pulled over.

Court documents say that as soon as the trooper pulled over the vehicle, Duncan immediately told him he had worked for the Mountlake Terrace Police Department for 18 years.  The trooper wrote that Duncan had "bloodshot and watery eyes" and smelled like alcohol.

Duncan allegedly begged the trooper not to arrest him.

Mountlake Terrace Police confirm to KING 5 that Duncan was placed on administrative leave in February, pending the outcome of the investigation.

Court documents say Duncan has pled not guilty to the charges.

KING 5 caught up with Duncan at his home in Lake Stevens.  He could not say much, because it is a pending case, but felt it was important for people to know his blood alcohol level was below the legal limit.

Court documents confirm his two breath samples registered at .055 and .058.  Both results are below the legal limit of .08. 

In the WSP report, the investigating trooper said the breathalyzer test wasn't administered until about two hours after he pulled Duncan over.  Based on the rate at which alcohol is metabolized by the body, the trooper wrote in his report that he stood by his decision to arrest Duncan.

Duncan told KING 5 there were some discrepancies in the investigative report.  He also says he would never use his position as a law enforcement officer to get special treatment during a traffic stop.

He is hopeful his name will eventually be cleared.

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