I Wonder: How did Point No Point get its name?

I Wonder: How did Point No Point get its name?

Credit: Kraig Anderson / lighthousefriends.com

The lighthouse at Point No Point, Wash.

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by TRAVIS PITTMAN / KING 5 News

KING5.com

Posted on July 5, 2010 at 10:30 PM

Updated Wednesday, Jul 21 at 11:36 AM

Point No Point

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I've always been fascinated by the name of this location ever since the day we had to launch SkyKING to cover a report of an overturned boat in the area.

Point No Point is located on the northeastern tip of the Kitsap Peninsula, about four miles due west of Whidbey Island.

It was named by U.S. Navy Lt. Charles Wilkes, who commanded the United States Exploring Expedition in 1841. As he approached the spit of land, he thought it was a substantial point. When he realized it was much smaller than he expected, he named it Point No Point.

The Point No Point Treaty was signed in 1855. The S'Klallam, Chimacum and Skokomish Tribes agreed to hand over ownership of their land in exchange for 3,840 acres in reservation land at the head of Hood Canal, $60,000, a free agricultural and industrial school and free access to a physician, a blacksmith, a carpenter and a farmer.

Point No Point is home to the oldest lighthouse in Puget Sound. It was first lit an 1879.

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