Downtown Seattle's most dangerous intersections

Downtown Seattle's most dangerous intersections

Credit: KING

Downtown Seattle's most dangerous intersections

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by ERIC WILKINSON / KING 5 News

KING5.com

Posted on December 17, 2010 at 6:25 PM

Updated Friday, Dec 17 at 9:23 PM

SEATTLE -- Dominick May-Douglass was walking home from school when he crossed Stone Way just two blocks from his home. A car didn't stop at the crosswalk and hit him, nearly killing him.

"It just kinda flips your life upside down," says Dominick.

Five years later, Dominick is still recovering from a massive brain injury and, despite changes to make the street safer, cars still don't stop in that crosswalk. One whizzed past as he and his mom, Desiree Douglass, crossed the street for this interview.

"They have no idea what's at stake," she says. "They just don't know."

It's the same story all over the city. A woman was seriously hurt Friday as she crossed Brooklyn Avenue in the University District. Ironically, one of the most dangerous intersections downtown is right across from Harborview Medical Center: 9th Avenue and James Street, where red light runners are rampant and people are well aware of the danger.

"I always hesitate after the walk sign," says Cindie Murphy, who works nearby. "And I keep my eye out while I'm crossing because you just never know."

9th and James is one of the three most dangerous intersections downtown, along with 3rd Avenue and Pike Street, and 8th Avenue & Pike Street, according to the Seattle Department of Transportation. SDOT figures show at least 10 people were hit at each crossing between 2006 and 2008. Click here to see a map

The agency is in the midst of a public relations campaign to get everyone to pay more attention on the roads.They also tell us since 2007 they have made nearly 4,000 improvements to crossings all over the city.  

As for Dominick and his mom, they just hope people will think when they get behind the wheel or step off a sidewalk.

"We have a huge responsibility and, once the mistake has been made, you can't undo it. You can't fix it," said Desiree.

Desiree and Dominick also run www.headstrongforlife.org which helps support survivors of traumatic brain injuries injuries.

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