Craigslist armored car robber sentenced

Craigslist armored car robber sentenced

Credit: KING

An armored car sits outside a Bank of America branch in Monroe, Wash. on Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2008 after it was robbed.

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by KING5.com Staff

KING5.com

Posted on July 27, 2009 at 2:06 PM

Updated Wednesday, Sep 23 at 11:25 AM

SEATTLE - A Monroe man who used Craigslist to hire unsuspecting decoys for his intricate armored car robbery last year was sentenced Monday to six years in prison.

Anthony Curcio, 28, pleaded guilty in May after prosecutors argued he robbed the vehicle to support a lavish lifestyle, which included taking friends and his girlfriend on a trip to Las Vegas, buying a new Range Rover and going on a shopping spree at an outlet mall.

On Sept. 30, 2008, the armored car was robbed outside a Bank of America in Monroe, located near a creek that dumps into the Skykomish River.

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Prosecutors say Curcio created an easily disposable construction worker disguise which included a wig and facemask. Then, he created a bogus Craigslist ad for construction work. In the ad, responders were asked to show up at a location near the bank wearing the same thing - a yellow vest, safety goggles, a respirator mask and, if possible, a blue shirt.

During the robbery, prosecutors say Curcio sprayed the amored car driver in the face with mace and stole a bag with about $400,000 inside. Then, he ripped off his disguise and was able to use the similarly dressed people he "hired" as decoys in order to make his escape. He had an inflatable raft set up at the nearby creek and strung a cable so that he could pull himself down the creek faster.

Investigators say a homeless man helped point them to Curcio. The transient told police he spotted Curcio taking the items for his disguise near a dumpster at the bank a couple of weeks before the robbery. The man gave police the license plate number of the car Curcio was driving that day - a car registered to his wife.

Investigators say Curcio's DNA matched DNA found on the discarded disguise.

According to court records, Curcio first hatched the idea while working for his parents' landscaping business in Seattle. Prosecutors say Curcio planned the robbery for nearly a year, studying delivery schedules and the best ways to escape afterward.

"This robbery stands out for its boldness, level of planning, and its ingenuity," wrote Asst. U.S. Attorney Bruce Miyake in his sentencing memo.

In his sentencing ruling, U.S. District Judge James L. Robart said having people show up dressed like Curcio put them at risk of being shot by the guards.

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