Supporters of repealing Obamacare worry what will replace it

According to the state health exchange, more than 750,000 in our state could be negatively impacted if the Affordable Care Act was repealed .But those numbers don't tell the entire story. Many people feel like Obamacare hurt more than helped.

If you ask Eric Levy how the last four years of Obamacare have treated him, he will say it's "insane."

He showed us the insurance bills for his family of four. Every year their premium has increased by double-digit percentages.

The Levy family went from a $500 monthly premium with a $1,000 deductible in 2012, to $940 a month and a $10,000 deductible in 2016.

Levy is a financial analyst. He estimates he and his wife bring in a combined salary of $250,000 each year. While he admits it sounds like a lot of money, he said with the current cost of living and owning a home in Seattle, it’s not as much as it used to be.

Last year, with the co-pays for his shoulder surgery, his family paid $20,000 for healthcare.

“Obamacare, a.k.a. Affordable Care, it's a disaster,” he said. “It's not working. We can't ask the Eric Levys of the world to pay $20,000 for their healthcare because they can. What kind of democracy is that?”

Related: House Republicans unveil Obamacare replacement bill

As upset as he is, Levy acknowledges taking coverage away from people who need it is dangerous. He believes the first priority for the government is “to make sure the elderly and the handicapped are taken care of.”

“Do I think Trump is the panacea? Of course not,” Levy said.

Knowing how complex repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act can be, we asked him how much confidence he has that the new administration will be able to fix the problem.

“Honestly? Zero,” he said.

Copyright 2017 KING


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