Pacific NW fishermen prepare for big salmon season

Pacific NW fishermen prepare for big salmon season

Pacific NW fishermen prepare for big salmon season

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by Associated Press

KING5.com

Posted on April 6, 2012 at 11:41 AM

Updated Friday, Apr 6 at 12:05 PM

SAN FRANCISCO -- Federal regulators will allow plenty of opportunity for fishermen to troll for Pacific Coast salmon as biologists forecast a dramatic rebound in populations of the prized fish.

The Pacific Fishery Management Council on Thursday approved salmon seasons that provide ample fishing time for commercial and recreational anglers in California, Oregon and Washington.

The council, which regulates Pacific Coast fisheries, chose the final set of regulations from three options approved last month.

The panel's decision comes as biologists project big increases in salmon populations from the Sacramento, Klamath and Rogue rivers. Their forecast for chinook salmon returning to the Klamath this fall is about four times greater than average and the highest on record since 1985.

That marks a sharp turnaround from just a few years ago when steep declines in salmon stocks led to the largest fishery closures on record in 2008 and 2009.

Biologists attribute the comeback to wet winters and favorable ocean conditions over the past few years that have allowed salmon to thrive and spawn in large numbers.

Under the approved regulations, most of the Pacific Coast will be open to commercial and sport fishing from May to September, with some areas open to recreational anglers in April.

Below are the descriptions of the council's limits on salmon fishing for the entire Washington coast and down to Cape Falcon in Oregon:

Recreational management measures adopted for non-Indian ocean salmon fisheries, 2012.

North of Cape Falcon -- Supplemental Management Information
1. Overall non-Indian TAC: 99,000 (non-mark-selective equivalent of 95,000) Chinook and 83,000 coho marked with a healed adipose fin clip (marked).
2. Recreational TAC: 51,500 (non-mark selective equivalent of 47,500) Chinook and 69,720 marked coho.
3. No Area 4B add-on fishery.
4. Buoy 10 fishery opens Aug. 1 with an expected landed catch of 8,300 marked coho in August and September.

U.S./Canada Border to Queets River

* June 16 through earlier of June 30 or a coastwide marked Chinook quota of 8,000 (C.5).
Seven days per week. Two fish per day, all salmon except coho, all Chinook must be marked with a healed adipose fin clip (C.1). Chinook 24-inch total length minimum size limit (B). See gear restrictions (C.2). Inseason management may be used to sustain season length and keep harvest within the overall Chinook recreational TAC for north of Cape Falcon (C.5).

Queets River to Leadbetter Point
* June 9 through earlier of June 23 or a coastwide marked Chinook quota of 8,000 (C.5).
Seven days per week. Two fish per day, all salmon except coho, all Chinook must be marked with a healed adipose fin clip (C.1). Chinook 24-inch total length minimum size limit (B). See gear restrictions (C.2). Inseason management may be used to sustain season length and keep harvest within the overall Chinook recreational TAC for north of Cape Falcon (C.5).

Leadbetter Point to Cape Falcon

* June 9 through earlier of June 22 or a coastwide marked Chinook quota of 8,000 (C.5).
Seven days per week. Two fish per day, all salmon except coho, all Chinook must be marked with a healed adipose fin clip (C.1). Chinook 24-inch total length minimum size limit (B). See gear restrictions (C.2). Inseason management may be used to sustain season length and keep harvest within the overall Chinook recreational TAC for north of Cape Falcon (C.5).

U.S./Canada Border to Cape Alava (Neah Bay)
* July 1 through earlier of September 23 or 7,250 marked coho subarea quota with a subarea guideline of 4,700 Chinook. (C.5).
Seven days per week. All salmon except no chum beginning August 1; two fish per day. All coho must be marked (C.1). Beginning August 1, Chinook non-retention east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line (C.4.a) during Council managed ocean fishery. See gear restrictions and definitions (C.2, C.3). Inseason management may be used to sustain season length and keep harvest within the overall Chinook and coho recreational TACs for north of Cape Falcon (C.5).

Cape Alava to Queets River (La Push Subarea)
* July 1 through earlier of September 23 or 1,760 marked coho subarea quota with a subarea guideline of 2,050 Chinook. (C.5).
* September 29 through earlier of October 14 or 50 marked coho quota or 50 Chinook quota (C.5) in the area north of 47°50'00 N. lat. and south of 48°00'00" N. lat.
Seven days per week. All salmon; two fish per day. All coho must be marked (C.1). See gear restrictions and definitions (C.2, C.3). Inseason management may be used to sustain season length and keep harvest within the overall Chinook and coho recreational TACs for north of Cape Falcon (C.5).

Queets River to Leadbetter Point (Westport Subarea)

* June 24 through earlier of September 23 or 25,800 marked coho subarea quota with a subarea guideline of 25,600 Chinook (C.5).
Sunday through Thursday. All salmon; two fish per day, no more than one of which can be a Chinook. All coho must be marked (C.1). See gear restrictions and definitions (C.2, C.3). Inseason management may be used to sustain season length and keep harvest within the overall Chinook and coho recreational TACs for north of Cape Falcon (C.5).

Leadbetter Point to Cape Falcon (Columbia River Subarea)

* June 23 through earlier of September 30 or 34,860 marked coho subarea quota with a subarea guideline of 11,100 Chinook (C.5).
Seven days per week. All salmon; two fish per day, no more than one of which can be a Chinook. All coho must be marked (C.1). See gear restrictions and definitions (C.2, C.3). Columbia Control Zone closed (C.4). Inseason management may be used to sustain season length and keep harvest within the overall Chinook and coho recreational TACs for north of Cape Falcon (C.5).

Commercial troll management measures for non-Indian ocean salmon fisheries:

May 1 through earlier of June 30 or 31,700 Chinook quota.

Seven days per week (C.1). All salmon except coho (C.7). Cape Flattery, Mandatory Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area, and Columbia Control Zones closed (C.5). See gear restrictions and definitions (C.2, C.3). An inseason conference call will occur when it is projected that 24,975 Chinook have been landed to consider modifying the open period to five days per week and adding landing and possession limits to ensure the guideline is not exceeded (C.8.f). Cape Flattery, Mandatory Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area, and Columbia Control Zones closed (C.5). Vessels must land and deliver their fish within 24 hours of any closure of this fishery. Under state law, vessels must report their catch on a state fish receiving ticket. Vessels fishing or in possession of salmon while fishing north of Leadbetter Point must land and deliver their fish within the area and north of Leadbetter Point. Vessels fishing or in possession of salmon while fishing south of Leadbetter Point must land and deliver their fish within the area and south of Leadbetter Point, except that Oregon permitted vessels may also land their fish in Garibaldi, Oregon. Oregon State regulations require all fishers landing salmon into Oregon from any fishery between Leadbetter Point, Washington and Cape Falcon, Oregon must notify ODFW within one hour of delivery or prior to transport away from the port of landing by either calling 541-867-0300 Ext. 271 or sending notification via e-mail to nfalcon.trollreport@state.or.us. Notification shall include vessel name and number, number of salmon by species, port of landing and location of delivery, and estimated time of delivery. Inseason actions may modify harvest guidelines in later fisheries to achieve or prevent exceeding the overall allowable troll harvest impacts.

July 1 through earlier of September 18 or 15,800 preseason Chinook guideline (C.8) or a 13,280 marked coho quota (C.8)

July 1-4 then Friday through Tuesday July 6-August 21 with a landing and possession limit of 40 Chinook and 35 coho per vessel per open period; Friday through Monday August 24-September 17, with a landing and possession limit of 20 Chinook and 40 coho per vessel per open period (C.1, C.8.f). No earlier than September 1, if at least 5,000 marked coho remain on the quota, inseason action may be considered to allow non-selective coho retention (C.8.e). All Salmon except no chum retention north of Cape Alava, Washington in August and September (C.7). All coho must be marked except as noted above (C.8.d). See gear restrictions and definitions (C.2, C.3). Mandatory Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area, Cape Flattery and Columbia Control Zones, and beginning August 1, Grays Harbor Control Zone Closed (C.5). Vessels must land and deliver their fish within 24 hours of any closure of this fishery. Vessels fishing or in possession of salmon while fishing north of Leadbetter Point must land and deliver their fish within the area and north of Leadbetter Point. Vessels fishing or in possession of salmon while fishing south of Leadbetter Point must land and deliver their fish within the area and south of Leadbetter Point, except that Oregon permitted vessels may also land their fish in Garibaldi, Oregon. Under state law, vessels must report their catch on a state fish receiving ticket. Oregon State regulations require all fishers landing salmon into Oregon from any fishery between Leadbetter Point, Washington and Cape Falcon, Oregon must notify ODFW within one hour of delivery or prior to transport away from the port of landing by either calling 541-867-0300 Ext. 271 or sending notification via e-mail to nfalcon.trollreport@state.or.us. Notification shall include vessel name and number, number of salmon by species, port of landing and location of delivery, and estimated time of delivery. Inseason actions may modify harvest guidelines in later fisheries to achieve or prevent exceeding the overall allowable troll harvest impacts.
 

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