BC-NY--New York Digest, NY

Print
Email
|

Associated Press

Posted on October 28, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Members can send stories and tips to apalbany(at)ap.org for upstate and apnyc(at)ap.org for the New York metro area. The New York City bureau may be reached at 212-621-1670 and the Albany bureau at 518-458-7821. The photo desk is reachable at 212-621-1902. AP stories, along with the photos that accompany them, can also be obtained from http://www.apexchange.com. Reruns are available from the Service Desk (877-836-9477).

NEW:

— SUPERSTORM-UPSTATE

— SUPERSTORM-AMTRAK

— MISSING NYC BOY

— STATUE OF LIBERTY-REOPENING

— DOLPHINS-JETS

TOP STORIES:

SUPERSTORM-NYC

NEW YORK — New York City shut down its mass transit system, closed its schools and ordered hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes Sunday in the face of increasingly dire predictions about the wall of water that could hit the nation's largest city as part of the superstorm bearing down on the East Coast. A seawater surge of anywhere from 6 to 11 feet threatened to swamp parts of lower Manhattan, flood subway tunnels and knock out the underground network of power, phone and high-speed Internet lines that are the lifeblood of America's financial capital. By Jennifer Peltz. AP Photos.

With:

— SUPERSTORM-NYC-GLANCE: NYC offers storm challenges above ground and below

SUPERSTORM

NEW YORK — Big cities from Washington to Boston buttoned up on Sunday against the onslaught of a superstorm that could menace 50 million people in the most heavily populated corridor in the nation, with forecasters warning New York could be in particular peril. "The time for preparing and talking is about over," Federal Emergency Management Administrator Craig Fugate warned as Hurricane Sandy made its way up the Atlantic on a collision course with two other weather systems that could turn it into one of the most fearsome storms on record in the U.S. "People need to be acting now." By Jennifer Peltz and Allen G. Breed. AP Photos.

SUPERSTORM-WATER

KENSINGTON, Md.— Meteorologists and disaster experts say water is what worries them most with the upcoming monster storm, spawning from Hurricane Sandy. They said Sunday that water threatens the most lives and is likely to cause substantial property damage. They fear storm surge amped by waves and the full moon. Up to a foot of rain should trigger inland and flash flooding. By Seth Borenstein.

SUPERSTORM-UPSTATE

ALBANY, N.Y. — High winds pose a greater threat than rain in upstate New York as Hurricane Sandy approaches and converges with other storm systems in the Northeast, according to the National Weather Service. The agency has posted high wind warnings and flood watches across the state, effective Monday morning through Tuesday. Forecasters said widespread power outages are likely when wind gusts topple trees and power lines.

SUPERSTORM-AIRLINES

NEW YORK — Airlines hurried to fly passengers and planes out of the Northeast Sunday as Hurricane Sandy moved up the coast. The massive storm threatens to bring a near halt to air travel for two days in a key region for both domestic and international flights. On Sunday, the airlines moved planes away from the East Coast to avoid damage, and added flights out of Washington, D.C., and New York City area airports.

With: BC-NY--Superstorm-NY-Guard; BC-NY--Superstorm-Broadway; BC-US--Superstorm-5 Things to Know; BC-US--Superstorm-NYSE; BC-NJ--Superstorm-PATH; BC-US--Superstorm-How To Prepare; BC-NY--Superstorm-East Coast Ferry; BC-NY--Superstorm-NY-Utilities; BC-NY--Superstorm-NY-Irene; BC-NY--Superstorm-NY-Backcountry; BC-US--Superstorm-Amtrak; BC-Superstorm-Sports

MISSING NYC BOY

NEW YORK — While prosecutors weigh what to do about a suspect who surprisingly surfaced this spring in the landmark 1979 disappearance case of Etan Patz, the man who was the prime suspect for years is about to go free after more than two decades in prison for molesting other children. These two threads in the tangled story are set to cross next month, a twist that evokes decades of uncertainties and loose ends in the search for what happened to the sandy-haired 6-year-old last seen walking to his Manhattan school bus stop. By Jennifer Peltz and Colleen Long.

SUPREME COURT-VOTING RIGHTS

WASHINGTON — Three years ago, the Supreme Court warned there could be constitutional problems with a landmark civil rights law that has opened voting booths to millions of African-Americans. Now, opponents of a key part of the Voting Rights Act are asking the high court to finish off that provision. The basic question is whether state and local governments that once boasted of their racial discrimination still can be forced in the 21st century to get federal permission before making changes in the way they hold elections. By Mark Sherman and Jay Reeves.

CHILD MURDER-EXECUTION

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Torrential overnight rains had washed away the blood so the searchers at first thought the pale form lying on the earthen berm might be a mannequin. The shocking discovery that night in 1990 began a 22-year legal and emotional saga that is expected to end Tuesday, when Donald Moeller, who was convicted of abducting and murdering 9-year-old Becky O'Connell, is scheduled to be put to death by lethal injection in the state penitentiary. The child's mother, Tina Curl, plans to drive the 1,400 miles back to Sioux Falls from her native New York state to watch Moeller take his last breath. By Dirk Lammers.

NATIVE AMERICAN SAINT

ALBANY, N.Y. — Some traditional Mohawks are treating the naming of the nation's first Native American saint with skepticism and fear that the Roman Catholic Church is using it to shore up its image and marginalize traditional spiritual practices. They see the story of Kateri Tekakwitha as yet another reminder of colonial atrocities and religious oppression. By Mary Esch.

SPORTS:

DOLPHINS-JETS

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — After a week of back-and-forth trash talk, the Miami Dolphins settled this one on the field. And it was no contest. Matt Moore threw a touchdown pass to Anthony Fasano after stepping in for injured Ryan Tannehill and the Dolphins didn't miss a beat, rolling past the New York Jets 30-9 on Sunday for their third straight victory.

JETS-BYRD'S NO 90

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Former Jets defensive end Dennis Byrd was introduced as the final member of New York's defense, 20 years after his career ended because of an injury that left him briefly paralyzed. The team is retiring Byrd's No. 90 jersey at halftime of the game against the Miami Dolphins on Sunday. Byrd came out of the tunnel as his name was announced a few minutes before the game and was greeted by the entire team in the end zone — and received a standing ovation from the MetLife Stadium crowd. By Dennis Waszak Jr.

DOLPHINS-JETS-PINK PENALTY FLAGS

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Dante Cano had a big idea, so he wrote a letter and sent it to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. With the NFL using pink on hats, cleats and uniforms during the month of October for breast cancer awareness, thought the 11-year-old fan from Marlboro, N.J., why not use the color on the normally yellow penalty flags? By Dennis Waszak Jr.

AP Photo.

ALSO:

— STATUE OF LIBERTY-REOPENING: Superstorm cuts short Statue of Liberty reopening

— COLD-WEATHER BOATING: Vt. warns cold-weather boaters of flotation need

— DEER-FATAL CRASH: NY man dies after car collides with deer

— BAND COMPETITION: NY marching bands compete at Carrier Dome

— TRAIN DEATH: NY man struck, killed by freight train

— FATAL SHOOTING: NY man shot dead outside Schenectady bar

—BANKRUPTCY FRAUD: NY bankruptcy fraud results in prison sentence

Print
Email
|