Why your Thanksgiving turkey tastes like dinosaur

Why your Thanksgiving turkey tastes like dinosaur

Credit: AFP/Getty Images

CHIBA, JAPAN: Tomomi Adachi (C), exhibition guide, assembles a model skelton of a "Deinonychus" as she explains about the dinosaur during a press preview of the Dinosaur Exhibition in Chiba, suburban Tokyo, 15 July 2004. Some 145 dinosaurs will be displayed at the expo which will start 16 July until 12 September. AFP PHOTO/Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)

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by TRAVIS PITTMAN / KING 5 News

KING5.com

Posted on November 21, 2012 at 2:56 PM

Updated Wednesday, Nov 21 at 3:03 PM

When you bite into that Thanksgiving turkey on Thursday, take note that you’re biting into the descendant of a dinosaur.

Brian Switek, who blogs about everything prehistoric, says the Deinonychus was a feathered dinosaur, separated from its cousin the turkey by about 110 million years of evolution.

Deinonychus has also been called, "terrible claw" referring to its large, sickle-shaped talon on the second toe of each hind foot. This dinosaur is often associated with the more popular Velociraptor.

“Birds were the only lineage of dinosaur to survive the catastrophe that wiped out their relatives 66 million years ago,” writes Switek for Slate.com

Switek goes on to write how other species, besides, humans, ate dinosaurs over the millennia including other dinosaurs, sharks and even beetles.
 

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