Council delays vote on pot facility at Redmond Ridge

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by LINDA BYRON / KING 5 News

Bio | Email | Follow: @LByronK5

KING5.com

Posted on December 2, 2013 at 8:24 PM

Updated Monday, Dec 2 at 8:40 PM

REDMOND, Wash. -- Families moved to Redmond Ridge for the schools, parks and close knit community.  They never expected they could end up with a large marijuana growing and processing plant as a neighbor.  

“This is like a mini city,” said Redmond Ridge parent Tamara Collins, “we’re not called a city, but we’re like a city and it shouldn’t be up here.”

Last week Redmond Ridge residents learned that a company named Red Ridge Farms had filed for a permit with the Washington State Liquor Control Board to operate a growing and processing facility in a large nondescript business park in Redmond Ridge.  The site is surrounded by trees and is beyond the one thousand foot buffer from schools and parks, but just barely.  And it’s adjacent to a popular trail used frequently by adults and children of all ages.  There is a ball park and day care facility less than a third of a mile away.

“It’s very inconsiderate and outrageous.  You can do it somewhere but don’t do it in a neighborhood that’s filled with kids” said Ruth Thomas, a 15 year old resident of Redmond Ridge who predicts having a marijuana facility nearby would encourage more teenagers to try the drug.

Redmond Ridge residents waged a petition campaign and turned up in force at a King  County Council hearing Monday afternoon arguing passionately against locating a marijuana grow operation so close to a densely populated residential community.

After hearing from dozens of residents and receiving hundreds of phone calls and e-mails, the King County Council appeared to be reconsidering.  A vote on the re-zoning ordinance was postponed until Dec. 9.

King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert told KING 5 that she will introduce an amendment to the ordinance removing Redmond Ridge as an approved site.

“There’s too many young children and senior citizens in the area and I don’t think it should be done in an area that’s this dense,” Lambert said.
 

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