'Cash mob' packs Maple Valley store

'Cash mob' packs Maple Valley store

'Cash mob' packs Maple Valley store

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by ZAHID ARAB / KING 5 News

KING5.com

Posted on March 6, 2013 at 11:46 PM

Updated Wednesday, Mar 6 at 11:47 PM

MAPLE VALLEY, Wash. -- When a Maple Valley woman was killed in a fiery Las Vegas crash weeks ago, it was a blow to close friends and complete strangers.

Sandi Sutton helped run "The Dazzled Dame.” Flowers and candles are still outside in her memory.

On Wednesday the store was elbow room only, for a cash mob.

"I'm really nervous," said Leih Mulvihill, who was in Las Vegas with Sandi when the shooting happened.

Mulvihill, Sandi's business partner at the store, remembers her last  moments with her friend.

"She was enveloped in a bright glow," she said.

"It was just so beautiful and I didn't see anyone else lit up. It was later I realized it was her angel that took her home," said Mulvilhill.

Outside the store, more than 50 people gathered.

"I'm a mobster, a proud mobster," said a woman.

Tamra Roche and Megan Sheridan only knew Sutton from shopping at the store. The two connected through social media and organized the event. They came ready to spend.

"It's all about my husband's credit card," said Sheridan.

The crowd stormed into the store, some spending hundreds of dollars. Sutton was a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Parents Teachers Association (PTA) and active with fundraising for Breast Cancer research. She was a two-time survivor. The event is the community's way of returning the favor.

"It's a really tight knit community," said  Terri Beringer, who never met Sutton.

Despite being swamped at the register, Mulvihill can't help but smile and erupt in laughter.

"With every cloud there's a bit of sunshine. Sandi's definitely brought that sunshine," she said.

Shoppers say supportin the event was their way of paying Sutton's contributions to  the community forward. Portions raised from it will go towards scholarships for Breast Cancer survivors and homeless families.

Sutton was an advocate for both.

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