Bill Gates urges Congress to pass immigration bill

Bill Gates urges Congress to pass immigration bill

Credit: AFP/Getty Images

Bill Gates urges Congress to pass immigration bill

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by Catalina Camia, USA TODAY

KING5.com

Posted on July 11, 2014 at 7:13 AM

Updated Friday, Jul 11 at 7:13 AM

Three of America’s richest men are fed up with gridlock in Congress and are urging lawmakers to get moving on an immigration bill.

Warren Buffett, Bill Gates and Sheldon Adelson wrote in a New York Times op-ed column that it’s time for the House to pass a bill “that reflects both our country’s humanity and its self-interest” for the good of U.S. economy.

“You don’t have to agree on everything in order to cooperate on matters about which you are reasonably close to agreement,” the three billionaires wrote. “It’s time that this brand of thinking finds its way to Washington.”

While these three influential business leaders are on the same page about the need for an overhaul of immigration laws, they differ in their politics and that’s what makes this column stand out.

Warren Buffett and Bill Gates both have donated to President Obama’s campaign and have consulted with the White House on issues. Adelson, a casino mogul, is one of the Republican Party’s biggest donors and, with his wife, donated more than $100 million to influence the 2012 elections. They agree they could come to an agreement on immigration, so why can’t the Republicans and Democrats in Congress do the same?  They write:

The three of us vary in our politics and would differ also in our preferences about the details of an immigration reform bill. But we could without doubt come together to draft a bill acceptable to each of us.

The Senate passed a comprehensive, bipartisan immigration bill more than a year ago that includes a pathway to citizenship — a sticking point for House conservatives who view the provision as amnesty for lawbreakers. House leadership on Thursday told Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., that his plan to overhaul the nation’s immigration laws will not be considered this year — essentially bringing an end in Congress of any hope for a deal.

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