Lost Oregon boy rescued for second time in five years

Lost Oregon boy rescued for second time in five years

Lost Oregon boy rescued for second time in five years

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by Cornelius Swart, KGW.com Staff

KING5.com

Posted on December 29, 2013 at 1:02 PM

Updated Sunday, Dec 29 at 1:02 PM

PORTLAND--- An autistic teenager who was lost in the Columbia River Gorge overnight was found Sunday morning, county deputies said. It was the second time in five years that boy had been rescued from a wilderness hike.

Alex Irvin, 16, went missing while hiking in the gorge on Saturday afternoon.  He was found at approximately 8:30 a.m. Sunday near a remote hiking lodge overlooking the Columbia River. He was in good condition said Lt. Steve Alexander of the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office.

Irvin, has moderate to severe autism.  A guest at the Nesika Lodge spotted Irvin and brought him inside. The boy had been outside all night and was fed and given liquids, said Lt. Alexander.

The lodge is located 7 to 8 miles up the Franklin Ridge trail and is perched some 1,800 feet over the river. Deputies were working to bring Irvin's father up to the lodge.

At approximately 4:50 p.m. Saturday, Multnomah County deputies responded to reports of a lost hiker in the area of Ponytail Falls. Irvin had been become separated from his hiking group around 2:30 p.m.

Overnight, up to 30 rescuers, a K9 unit and an Oregon Air National Guard helicopter searched for Irvin, as nighttime temperatures dropped into the 20's.

This was not the first time the boy had become lost on a hike.

Backstory: Boy rescued after three nights

The boy went missing for three nights near Mount St. Helens in 2008.  On August 2, Irvin, then 11, was hiking on the Siouxon trail near Amboy Wash. with his father when the two decided to split up and meet down at Siouxon Falls.

When the boy did not arrive at the falls, his father Bruce Irvin, called the sheriff's office. Alex was found on August 4.

KGW reported that Bruce Irvin said Alex’s condition limited his ability to communicate but that the boy had a good sense of direction.

Bruce Irving said at the time the family might reconsider how much independence they gave him.

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