Perennials that spruce up shady spots

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by New Day Producers

KING5.com

Posted on April 22, 2013 at 11:00 AM

Updated Tuesday, Apr 23 at 7:52 AM

There is a common misconception in gardening that there aren't any cool perennials that grow in shady locations. Gardening guru Ciscoe Morris is here to show us the coolest and newest plants that can light up any shady spot.   

Don't let the shady spot in your garden be boring. These shade perennials are so colorful and interesting, they'll make your shade garden the most beautiful area in your garden!
 

  • Mukdenia rossi 'Crimson Fans'- Red leaved Mukdenia -Fanned, maple-like leaves emerge bright green in spring, age to bronze-green and by summer mature to green with bright red streaks. In early spring, white bell-shaped flowers dance above the foliage. Excellent groundcover for woodland gardens.
  • Hosta 'St. Elmos's Fire' - 'Saint Elmo's Fire' Hosta has pure white margins that surround yellow centers in Spring. The centers on this hosta change to light green as the season progresses. The light lavender flowers mid summer are highly attractive to hummingbirds.
  • Actaea 'Chocoholic' - This dark beauty is only 2 to 3 feet in height when mature, smaller by about half than most Black Snakeroots. The leaves remain a spectacular purplish-black dusky overlay of color. In late summer pink to white foam-like flowers spiky flowers give off a wonderful fragrance.
  • Dicentra spectabilis 'Valentine' - This newly introduced Chinese bleeding heart features rich, red , dangling puffed heart shaped flowers, on dark red stems. It has distinctively cut, lobed foliage of green to gray/purple in color. These vibrant red flowers make delightful additions to fresh bouquets, lasting about 2 weeks.
  • Disporum cantoniense ‘Night Heron’ - Chinese fairy bells - In spring dark black-purple stems rise like asparagus from the soil, reaching heights of 4 to 6 feet tall. Each lustrous stem develops gracefully arching side shoots, giving an exotic, bamboo-like appearance. In April clusters of pale, chartreuse-yellow flowers nestle among the chocolate-purple leaves on each branch tip. By late May the foliage matures to a shiny, purple tinted deep green, remaining wonderfully evergreen, seemingly oblivious to winter, until the new growth starts next spring.

For more great tips for your yard and garden, watch Gardening with Ciscoe every Saturday morning on KING5. You can also find more info at www.ciscoe.com.
 

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