Narcissistic, antisocial – how is Facebook affecting teens?

Narcissistic, antisocial – how is Facebook affecting teens?

Credit: KING

Narcissistic, antisocial – how is Facebook affecting teens?

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by KING 5 News

KING5.com

Posted on August 8, 2011 at 11:34 AM

Updated Friday, Jan 4 at 10:45 AM

LONG BEACH, Calif. --Due to the extreme popularity of social media use, researchers have increased their attention on the development of psychological disorders resulting in teens who obsess over Facebook. They’ve found antisocial behavior, narcissism and a many other character flaws may be on the rise due to teens overdosing on the world's most prevelent social media site.

These findings come from a recent study performed by Larry Rosen, professor of psychology at California State University. Rosen’s study used a number of computer-based surveys that were given to 1,000 urban adolescents as well as 15-minute observations of 300 teens in the act of studying, according to Mashable.com

Rosen spoke of his findings at the 119th Annual Convention of the American Psychology Association in a presentation he titled “Poke Me: How Social Networks Can both Help and Harm Our Kids.”

Here are some of Professor Rosen’s findings:

  • Teens were more likely to develop narcissistic behaviors if they used Facebook often.
  • Young adults with a strong presence on Facebook show more signs of psychological disorders such as mania, aggression and anti-social behaviors.
  • Overuse of media and technology has an overall negative effect on the health of all adolescents as they are more prone to anxiety and depression. They are also more likely to have future health problems.
  • Students who checked Facebook at least once during a 15-minute study period experienced lower grades.

Not all of the study's results showed Facebook to be a negative influence on the lives of teens. Sometimes naturally introverted teens can learn how to socialize through Facebook, he found. “Virtual empathy” was also a common positive attribute found in teens who often use Facebook.

To read more about Professor Rosen’s study, visit Mashable.com.
 

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