The ancient art of Japanese flower arranging

The ancient art of arranging flowers in Japan, called Ikebana, allows each arranger to put their own personality in each of their unique arrangements.

SEATTLE - It's flower arrangement with a Japanese twist.

The ancient art of arranging flowers in Japan, called Ikebana, allows each arranger to put their own personality in each of their unique arrangements.

Megumi Schacher is a local Ikebana artist and instructor, specializing in the Sogetsu School style. This Ikebana style is more than 90 years old and differs from traditional Ikebana because it is more avant-guard.

"I'm a strict teacher, but I really enjoy teaching," Megumi said about her classes. "It takes a lot of time, it takes a lot of energy."

But her students still appreciate her.

"I learn so much from her," one student said. "She's great."

Megumi explained the importance of the different shapes and colors plants have that make an impact on the overall arrangement. She pointed out some red spots on the leaves of one plant she picked out from the garden.

"That kind of thing, we need it -- Ikebana people," Megumi explained. "Teeny things."

Despite the art being time-consuming, Ikebana continues to be Megumi's passion. She hopes to someday decorate department store windows with her Ikebana arrangements like Ikebana masters do in Japan.

"Ikebana is really like a life," Megumi revealed. "We are so close to nature, but we don't touch it. But if we touch it, we know that nature more."

Megumi offers classes on Ikebana in Seattle, Lynnwood and Bellevue. She also has online tutorials available on her YouTube channel.

 

 

Evening is your guide to Seattle and the Pacific Northwest.   Watch it weeknights at 7:30 on KING 5 TV or streaming live on KING5.com.  Connect with Evening via FacebookTwitterInstagram or email: eveningtips@king5.com.

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