Why the "Home Team" will wear RED on Friday

Why the

Why the "Home Team" will wear RED on Friday

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by Shelley Simpson

KING5.com

Posted on February 3, 2011 at 1:03 PM

Updated Thursday, Feb 3 at 1:54 PM

Celebrate “National Wear Red Day” on Friday, February 4th to promote awareness for the American Heart Association’s “Go Red For Women” campaign. “Go Red For Women” is a powerful, social campaign promoting awareness of heart disease among women and encouraging women to take charge of their heart health.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women.

That means more women die of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than all forms of cancer combined. Given that is so common, it is hard not to find a family that has been touched by a heart condition.

This Friday YOU will have an opportunity to help. Join the Home Team and wear red. It’ll help the American Heart Association spread the word about heart health.

Here’s why some of our family members will be wearing red. Leave a comment at the bottom of this article and tell us why you will be too!

“My father-in-law had open heart surgery this October. He is doing great now, but this is a man that was doing everything right; eating well, exercising, doing all the right things but was affected due to genetics. Heart Disease can affect anyone.” – Meg Coyle (Anchor Reporter)

“Heart disease is extremely prevalent in my family. My mother had a defective heart valve replaced 8 years ago. My father has undergone quintuple bypass surgery, and has had stents and a pacemaker implanted. Two of my grandfathers have gone under triple and quadruple bypass surgery as well. Over the past five years, my family and I have made some drastic lifestyle changes; I have lost over 75 lbs and my cholesterol is almost negligible. Even though I have made these changes, I fully anticipate a bypass at some point given my genetics.” – Keith Board (Chief Editor)

“I will be wearing red for my grandmother who has survived 3 major strokes within the last 2 years. She is a fighter and someone who I have admired greatly and looked up to as a role model for my success. She has truly beaten the odds.” – Tracy Taylor (Traffic Correspondent)

“My paternal grandmother died of a stroke and my maternal grandmother suffered a stroke in her mid 60’s which took her from independent living to a nursing home for her remaining 20+ years. My mother also dealt with high blood pressure issues early in her life until she died at 79.  I am 63 and have been taking medicine for high blood pressure for the past 7 years. I am, now, more careful with what I eat and walk, instead of drive, when I can.” – Anonymous

“Personally, I have lost a father, a grandmother and grandfathers to heart disease. I would like to see women become better informed and also become advocates for their health. Women need to be better informed advocates on behalf of their own heart heath. Heart disease is preventable and can be maintained if the proper actions are taken.” – Pat Costello (KING 5 Station Manager & Executive Board Member for “Go Red For Women” Campaign)

“Growing up I had rapid heartbeat episodes that forced me to stop what I was doing, and at times, kept me from playing basketball or participating in phys ed. In junior high, I had a catheter oblation, which was a fairly new procedure at the time. Shortly after that, I volunteered for the American Heart Association, sharing my story with others and to raise awareness about heart issues and the importance of advancing technology.” – Joe Fryer (News Reporter)
 

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