Pierce County Assessor Mike Lonergan calls this year’s property taxes the “perfect storm.”

Pierce County residents may see that storm rage once their property tax bills are sent out this week.

Lonergan says the 2018 property taxes are “uniquely high.”

“I think there can be a disconnect for people. They want to have good schools and they want to have a policeman or fireman come when they call. And they like parks. When it comes to paying for it they don't always make the connection," said Lonergan.

Homeowners pay property taxes. Even for renters, those costs can often get passed along.

"We all saw what happened with the license tabs from Sound Transit. I don't think this is going to be as bad as that, but I do think people are going to say, ‘Man my taxes just keep going up.’"

Some of the hardest hit areas in Pierce County will be Gig Harbor and Sumner.

Gig Harbor residents are looking at paying $690.10 more with a tax rate increase of 17.26 percent. Sumner residents will get a $743.10 increase with a tax rate of 21.88 percent.

The reasons: in response to the McCleary decision there’s a state school tax in addition to local school taxes. There are also a number of other taxes people voted for to give more money to fire districts and parks.

"This is a result of voted taxes locally and a vote in the legislature and those are the reasons why your taxes are going up. It's nothing personal," said Lonergan.

Link: Average single-family dwelling property tax change